Nexus S: An outstanding phone, but Misses it’s Potential

The first phone to deliver Android 2.3 is an attempt between Samsung and Google with some exciting features. The hardware is elegant, and Android 2.3 delivers some valuable enhancement with no support for HSPA+ or expandable memory, the Nexus S falls short of its potential.

Hardware and Design

The Nexus S isn’t exactly jump and limits its hardware. Like the Nexus One, it has a 5-megapixel camera and is powered by a 1GHz processor. It has a few key differences.

In construction, it feels a lot flimsier and more plastic than its HTC counterpart. Measuring 4.9-by-2.5-by-0.43 inches thick, the phone is a bit larger than the Nexus One. Weighing 4.5 ounces, the Nexus S is lighter than its sibling.

Android 2.3, aka ‘Gingerbread’

The interface make Android look more genteel. The menu make icons pop, and animations make the UI more sociable and mischievous.

Google Apps and Multimedia

The music player remains the same as the one in Froyo–boring but easy enough to use. Videos downloaded to the phone played back easily and seems that a Super AMOLED display remains pretty visible in bright, outdoor sunlight.

Camera

The Nexus S has a 5-megapixel camera with a flash and the same resolution as the rest of the Galaxy S pack. It has autofocus, macro and infinity modes, four resolutions to choose from, nine scene settings, three color modes, three quality modes, and exposure metering. As mentioned above, Gingerbread’s camera interface adds support for multiple cameras.

You can shoot video as high as 720-by-480-pixels at 30 frames per second. A video I shot outdoors looked pretty good, if a bit edgy when a fast-moving object went by. Colors were accurate, and details appeared quite pointed.

Memory/Performance

The device has 512MB of RAM and is capped at 16GB of internal memory. And unlike the iPhone, there’s no 32GB model available. Powered by Samsung’s 1GHz Hummingbird processor, the Nexus S is quite speedy. Call quality over T-Mobile was of very good quality.

Conclusion

When Google and Samsung team up to make a phone to debut the latest and greatest version of Android, we bring high expectations. Overlooking T-Mobile’s next-generation network and for oversights like a dedicated camera key and flexible memory.

News Source: www.networkworld.com

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